Working Safely with Concrete
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First Aid If your clothing becomes wet, immediately change your clothing.

Eyes:    Gently flush with plenty of water for at least 15 minutes then see a doctor

Skin:    Remove Soaked clothing and wash skin with soap and water and vinegar*
Dust generated by the drilling, sawing or chasing hardened concrete may contain crystalline silica, which can cause lung disease. Avoid breathing concrete dust. Use adequate dust prevention and extraction methods. Wear suitable protective clothing, gloves, safety goggles and a dust mask that conforms to Australian Standards. If dust gets into the eyes, rinse with water continuously for 10 minutes. If dust is inhaled, move immediately to fresh air, seek prompt medical advice. Contact Alsafe Pre-Mix Concrete for more information or refer to Alsafe Pre-Mix Concrete Safety Data Sheet.

WARNING:
Freshly mixed cement, mortar, concrete or grout may cause skin injury. Avoid contact with the eyes and wash exposed skin areas thoroughly with water. If any cement paste gets into the eyes rinse with water continuously for ten minutes and get prompt medical treatment. Wear suitable protective clothing and gloves. Refer to further safety warnings on reverse.
*Note: “The first few minutes after contact with an alkeline substance are the most important in managing the burn, according to Dr Milner. Once it penetrates the skin, alkalis react with fat in the skin and progressively kill the tissue.” Dr Milner emphasized that alkaline burn victims should initially wash the area with clean water. Then apply vinegar, this helps to neutralise the alkalis 15 minutes faster than water alone, drastically reducing damage.

WARNING: DO NOT USE VINEGAR IN THE EYES!

Source of information: ASPS (American Society of Plastic Surgeons) April 21, 2003
Disclaimer: 'These warnings are provided in good faith by Alsafe. Notwithstanding this, it is a term of purchase of Alsafe Concrete that Alsafe will not be held liable for any claim arising from faulty handling, placing, curing, defective job practices, or physical contact with the concrete.'