The Handyman's Guide to Concreting at Home
 
 

“Formwork” is what we call the walls that support concrete until it has set. It forms a mould. The best material for formwork is timber at least 25mm thick with its width equal to the concrete thickness.

Structural plywood or hardboard can be used for paths. For curved paths, hardboard or 7mm plywood is suitable but requires more supporting pegs. The forms must be strong, smooth on the top edge, and well supported with stout pegs. A good test for the strength of formwork is its ability to withstand a reasonable sort of kick.

Plywood formwork from your building supply or timber merchant is easy to cut to shape, does an excellent job and can be reused for several jobs. You can cut enough formwork out of a standard 2440mm x 1220mm sheet to make a path a metre wide and about 10 metres long.

The formwork must be deep enough to hold the thickness of concrete to be placed and to prevent slurry escaping beneath.

“Formwork” is what we call the walls that support concrete until it has set. It forms a mould. The best material for formwork is timber at least 25mm thick with its width equal to the concrete thickness.

Structural plywood or hardboard can be used for paths. For curved paths, hardboard or 7mm plywood is suitable but requires more supporting pegs. The forms must be strong, smooth on the top edge, and well supported with stout pegs. A good test for the strength of formwork is its ability to withstand a reasonable sort of kick.

Plywood formwork from your building supply or timber merchant is easy to cut to shape, does an excellent job and can be reused for several jobs. You can cut enough formwork out of a standard 2440mm x 1220mm sheet to make a path a metre wide and about 10 metres long.

The formwork must be deep enough to hold the thickness of concrete to be placed and to prevent slurry escaping beneath.
DIY Alsafe Concrete